Why does global tech look to India for talent?

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Parag Agrawal, the new CEO of Twitter, is the latest alumni of India’s premier technical institutes to be named to the helm of a multibillion-dollar US digital company, and Ms. Shivani Nandgaonkar wants to follow in his footsteps. Mr. Agrawal’s alma school, the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Bombay, has already been recruited by Google to join the hundreds of IIT grads working at big American IT firms.
“I was overjoyed when I heard about Parag,” she remarked. “Sundar Pichai, a Google CEO, is an IITian. So this is my current (stepping) stone.” At 37 years old, Twitter’s Agrawal is the youngest CEO in the S&P 500 index of the world’s largest firms.
Why does global tech look to India for talent?
Parag Agrawal, the new CEO of Twitter, is the latest alumni of India’s premier technical institutes to be named to the helm of a multibillion-dollar US digital company, and Ms. Shivani Nandgaonkar wants to follow in his footsteps. Mr. Agrawal’s alma school, the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Bombay, has already been recruited by Google to join the hundreds of IIT grads working at big American IT firms.
“I was overjoyed when I heard about Parag,” she remarked. “Sundar Pichai, a Google CEO, is an IITian. So this is my current (stepping) stone.”
At 37 years old, Twitter’s Agrawal is the youngest CEO in the S&P 500 index of the world’s largest firms.
Other Indians at the top of the corporate tech ladder include IBM’s Arvind Krishna and Palo Alto Networks’ Nikesh Arora, both IIT graduates, and Microsoft’s Satya Nadella and Adobe’s Shantanu Narayen.
Beyond the South Asian nation’s sheer size, executives and analysts believe the phenomena are attributable to various push-pull forces and skillsets, including a problem-solving culture, the English language, and unrelenting hard work.

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