How the lifetime ban on cigarette sales in New Zealand will operate

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New Zealand announced on Thursday (Dec 9) that it will prohibit young people from purchasing cigarettes for the rest of their lives, one of the toughest measures in the world to reduce smoking-related deaths, as part of a larger plan to address the disproportionate impact on the country’s indigenous Maori population.
New Zealand is one of 17 nations that have made simple cigarette packaging mandatory. It also prohibits sales to anybody under 18, but it claims that these steps are insufficient to achieve the target of a national adult smoking rate of less than 5% by 2025. A ban for life
By 2027, New Zealand intends to make it illegal to offer cigarettes to anybody under 14. The prohibition will last the remainder of the person’s life. That implies that in 2073, a person aged 60 will be prohibited from purchasing cigarettes, but a person aged 61 will be permitted to do so. What’s the deal with 14 and under?
According to New Zealand health officials, smokers often start while they are young, with four out of five or around 80% of New Zealanders smoking by 18 and 96 percent by the age of 25. They want to save roughly 5,000 unnecessary deaths each year by preventing a generation from starting to smoke. What are additional modifications in the works?
The government wants to enact the new legislation by the end of next year, limiting the number of retailers that may sell cigarettes starting in 2024. By 2025, the nicotine – the most addictive chemical – in cigarettes will be reduced, making it easier to stop. Finally, beginning in 2027, it will usher in the “smoke-free” age.
What methods will be used to enforce the rules? The authorities in New Zealand have not said how they intend to enforce the ban or which stores would be prohibited from selling tobacco goods. Further information is expected when the proposal is presented before Parliament next year.

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